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HOW TO REPLACE YOUR TRANSFER BOX REAR OIL SEAL

HOW TO REPLACE YOUR TRANSFER BOX REAR OIL SEAL

by Gary Stretton, 6th May 2016

How to

Oil dripping from the transmission brake can be a simple fix, so don’t delay fitting a new seal. Gary Stretton explains...

The first signs of a leaking transfer box rear oil seal (next to the transmission brake) will be a small amount of oil on the ground beneath the vehicle. If the Land Rover has been stood for any length of time, check the gearbox oil level before driving it, as soft ground, grass and gravel might hide the actual amount of oil that has leaked out. Take a look at the inner chassis rails on each side of the brake drum – oily deposits left here are caused by the leaked oil being thrown out of the drum by centrifugal force as it rotates at high speed. If that is the case, assume at this stage that the transmission brake’s shoes are also covered in oil, even if the handbrake is still working – it probably won’t do for much longer. The good news is that the seal is easy to replace without special tools. While you have everything dismantled it’s also a good opportunity to paint and protect the components before it comes to re-assembly. Finally, buy the new oil seal from a source that you can trust. Once it’s fitted, you can then be confident that you shouldn’t have to deal with a similar problem again for some time.






1
STEP 1
STEP 1

Mark the propshaft flanges for refitting, then remove the propshaft nuts and bolts from the front and rear flanges and remove the propshaft.

2
STEP 2
STEP 2

Now you will be able to slacken off the brake shoe adjuster on the backplate, undo the drum nuts and remove the brake drum.

3
STEP 3
STEP 3

This is the oily mess I found after removing the drum. The handbrake still worked – though it was living on borrowed time!

4
STEP 4
STEP 4

Next, remove the split pin from the castellated nut. Always renew the split pin, unless, of course, it’s an emergency breakdown.

5
STEP 5
STEP 5

Undo the flange nut, ensuring the gearbox is in gear with the wheels chocked so that the transfer box shaft won’t rotate and the vehicle won’t roll.

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