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FITTING A NEW NINETY RADIATOR

FITTING A NEW NINETY RADIATOR

by Dave Barker, 6th May 2016

How to

This 1988 Ninety TD (Turbo Diesel) has covered over 260,000 miles and is still in use as the owner’s everyday transport. As you would expect, it is showing signs of its age, but is still going strong and is a much loved and cared for Land Rover. However, when checking the Ninety’s antifreeze we noticed a badly corroded radiator that was not only loosing coolant, but had also lost much of its cooling efficiency. It needed to be replaced. Being a vehicle of this age, it probably wouldn’t be the first time the radiator had been renewed. Sure enough, while removing the cowl and the radiator’s securing brackets it was apparent some of the bolts and screws where not original, and a mixture of sizes had been used in the past, though this would not prove to be a problem. The only real issue was with fitting the pipes for the engine oil cooler section, which is integral with the radiator. New oil pipe adaptors where needed to re-connect the oil pipes to the new radiator because their thread sizes were different. Luckily the parts are still available and our supplier had them in stock. Given the age of these vehicles, we can expect bolts, nuts and hose clips to be seized. That may cause extra work, but the job should still be accomplished in around two hours.



BEFORE

DRIVING AWAY
With the coolant level correct, start the engine and run it for a minute, then carefully remove the expansion tank cap and check the level. Check around the whole system for leaks, then start up again and run the engine until it is warm, then switch off and check again for leaks. Try to make the first journey a short one, allowing the engine to fully cool afterwards before again checking the coolant level when it is fully cold. While driving, check the temperature gauge rises and stays at its normal reading. If not, let the engine go cold and repeat the top-up procedure to remove any air. 

PARTS & COSTS
The radiator (with oil cooler) is part number NTC6168, costing around £250 on auction sites or between £125 to £300 from well known aftermarket suppliers. A Genuine Land Rover radiator is listed at £1193. Oil cooler pipe adaptor, number NTC3858, is listed at £23.50. All prices are plus VAT.

1
STEP 1
STEP 1

The radiator in this 1988 Ninety Turbo Diesel is surrounded by a large two-piece cowl that needs to be removed.

2
STEP 2
STEP 2

For best access, we disconnect the bonnet stay, and tie the bonnet securely back to the screen with a protective cloth between them.

3
STEP 3
STEP 3

First we unscrew and remove the various fasteners that are securing the top section of the plastic cowl to the radiator.

4
STEP 4
STEP 4

Then unclip the air filter assembly from the oil bowl and lift it clear. This will allow access to the lower screws securing the cowl in position.

5
STEP 5
STEP 5

The cowl is a two-section assembly, so the various flange screws that hold both sections of the cowl together and removed.

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