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LEARN TO WELD - PART 2

LEARN TO WELD - PART 2

by Alisdair Cusick, 14th May 2016

How to

If you’ve bought a welder and practiced your skills, you’ll be ready to follow Alisdair Cusick’s guide to basic body repair, and maybe have a go.

In last month’s overview of basic welding equipment and methods we learned about what happens during welding, examined the common processes available, selecting MIG as the most suitable for our Land Rovers, and then made our first practice welds. The aim of good practice is to build a level of skill that we can then apply to repairing our vehicle. Probably the most basic type of repair is to inner wing corrosion on early Discovery and Range Rover Classic models.



It’s a typical MoT failure point on these vehicles, but the flat section steel panel is perfect for applying our new MIG welding skills. With mainly flat, simple elements and good access, it gives a good structure to work against, and eventually match. We’ll be using our tack weld skill, and a few small runs of weld for this job, neatly carrying on from our bench work. The challenge now is in having to weld away from the bench, at various angles on the vehicle itself, and to prepare the area to ensure a good, strong weld. Of course, the simplest approach to this type of wing corrosion is to literally weld over the rust hole with a piece of steel – in other words, patch welding.

It may get you a basic MoT pass, but because you haven’t removed the corroded material, that corrosion will simply continue to spread over time. Before you know it, you’ll be back in there having to do the repair properly. The proper repair is, of course, a matter of cutting the damaged area back to good, solid metal, meaning the corrosion is removed, then cutting a repair section to exactly fit the hole and butt welding that in place. It’s the stronger, and correct, way to repair a corroded section such as an inner wing. And the result will look authentic, rather than a bodge. We’re back at Kingsley Cars, with welder Steve Fuller showing how to make a proper repair to a Range Rover Classic wing, using the MIG welder.

TOOLS: 
MIG welder, gauntlets, cap, mask, overalls, metal cutting and shaping tools, 1.2 mm steel sheet 

TIME: HOURS OF PRACTISE / COST £200 PLUS 

CONTACT: 
Thanks to Kingsley Cars (01865 884488), based just off the A40 in Oxfordshire for their help with this series. View their specialist work at http://www.kingsleycars.co.uk/range-rover-welding-repairs.htm'

NEXT MONTH:
In the next issue we’ll be looking at how to replace a complete body panel.





 

1
STEP 1
STEP 1

The classic inner wing rust hole. Ancillary fixing holes in the wings gradually begin to rust. Over time, they spread and open into large holes.

2
STEP 2
STEP 2

What looked like a few small holes from above, is part of a larger area of corrosion when viewed from below (outer wing removed for access).

3
STEP 3
STEP 3

Using a compressor-powered finger file, Steve begins to clean back the metal. He’s looking to find good, strong, corrosion-free material.

4
STEP 4
STEP 4

Once he’s found good metal, Steve swaps to a disc cutter to neatly cut out all of the corroded area. Be aware of any wiring above.

5
STEP 5
STEP 5

The outer edge has two layers of metal on the panel joint. Carefully cut the lamination off, but keep the piece you remove as a pattern for later.

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